Commonly used Abbreviations and Definitions in Data Migration

Commonly used Abbreviations and
Definitions in Data Migration

Abbreviations

BIDM Business Integrated Data Migration

CRM – Customer Relationship Management

DBA – Database Administrator

DM Data Migration

DP – Delivery Phases

DQ – Data Quality

DV – Data Verification

ECM – Electronic Content Management

ERP – Enterprise Resource Planning

ETL – Extract, Transform, Load

ICT – Information Communication, Technology

LA – Landscape Analysis

SFTP – Secure File Transfer Protocol

SH – Stakeholder

SIT – System Integration Testing

SME – Subject Matter Expert

SS – Spreadsheets

SSIS – SQL Server Integration Services

UAT – User Acceptance Testing

Definitions

Business Integrated Data Migration (BIDM) – Our proprietary methodology, used to keep projects on track

Data Dictionary – A set of information describing the contents, format, and structure of a database and the relationship between its elements

Data Mapping – Taking a field from a legacy system and pointing it to the equivalent field in the target system

Data Migration – The selection, Extraction, Transformation and Loading of data of the correct quality from a legacy system to the new target system within a set timeframe

Data Objects – are a logical subset of a business domain representation, encapsulating business information. E.g. Customer, Supplier, Employee etc

Data Owner – The people or person within an organisation that is responsible for signing off on the various stages of a data migration

DM Package – A collection of data migration collateral including the mapping specification documentation, stakeholders and data verification techniques.

DM REVOLVEData Migration Evolution Revolution – the set of data tools we use to help with a data migration

Legacy Data – A data store or stores that hold data to be transferred to a new target system

Landscape Analysis – The analysis of legacy data to find and catalogue its source and how the various sources relate to each other.

OBJECTS – See Data Objects

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *